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are a democrat or a republican. it doesn't care whether you're liberal or conservative. climate change will affect all americans no matter what your political beliefs, your religious beliefs, your race, class, creed, et cetera, okay. and in the end, the only way we're going to deal with this issue is if we come together as a country and have a serious conversation, not about is it real. but what can we do about it. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and pea
the timing of these changes in the forecast in just a few minutes. >>> in less than an hour parents and educators are planning a protest called think before you pink. it's happening at tonight's school board meeting in santa clara. bottom line, they don't want any teachers to lose their jauobs. the state deadline for pink slips is coming up. the board has money and should be focusing on class size, music, library hours and raises for educators instead of layoffs. the rally is scheduled to start at 6:00 this evening at the district office. nbc bay area's george katayama is there and will have a live report at 6:00. >>> a new proposal could call the deer don train station into san jose -- in san jose into silicon valley's version of times square. the city wants to transform the area into a central entertainment district. the plans include room for a new stadium for the a's, thousands of new residential units and nearly five million square feet of new office space. the plan would also add a b.a.r.t. extension and bullet train hub. they plan to draft an environmental impact report this
rapid technological change and investments. and, you know, i have to say i think part of it is the public's deep-seeded unease with robots. i mean, this goes back to the hal -- [inaudible] and a few other things we remember from our childhood. and, of course, political theater it was, but senator rand paul's filibuster really, i think, did to some degree muddy public understanding of the domestic uses of uas. so we don't do ourselves any favors either from an industry standpoint when we keep changing the names. i could go around this room, and i bet everyone here could come up with a different one. uas, uav, rpv. and now, get this, the latest one? uninhabited aerial vehicles? oh, come on. sexism? give me a break. [laughter] i think our speakers will shed light, though, on some of the more important of uas concern. i'm so delighted that from california frank pace was willing and able to come in, the president and ceo of general b atomics. and, of course, the developer of the predator, among other very leading aircraft in this area. what i really think about it, and i th
to treat my son that way? he decided in the and went on cnn and admitted he changed his mind. >> i'm announcing today a change of heart on a issue that a lot of people feel strongly about. it has to do with gay couple's right to marry. and i have taken a position against gay marry, rooted in part in my faith and my faith tradition. my son came to my wife and i and told us that he was gay, and that it was not a choice. >> bill: and he said given all of my years of being on the other side of this issue that really caused me to take another look at it. >> and that launched an interesting process for me, which was rethinking my position, talking with religious leaders and in the end changing my position on the issue. now believe that people ought to have the right to get married. >> bill: so he has done a total 180. now this is rob portman alone. he doesn't speak for the republican party or any other politician from ohio. >> rob is a great friend and long-time ally and i appear he has decided to change his view on this, but i believe that marriage is a union of a
a change in tone. way to open the door to compromise. what? oh, wait. i'm being told that we got out of the video too soon. let's play the last bit. i'm sure it's great. >> but if the president consists on tax hikes, i don't think we're going to get very far. >> no new taxes. read my lips. i think we see why speaker boehner and his friend mcconnell are dining alone. >>> joining me now are angela rye and nia spmalika henderson. is the gop leadership the real problem here? >> absolutely. reverend al, when you look at what has happened from last night until even this morning, you saw the gop leave dinner with president obama and some of them went straight to the senate floor and the tone even changed then. then, this morning, you have senator mccain and senator graham almost berating rand paul from the night before. i think that you're seeing a real shiflt. shift you're seeing speaker boehner say that he is the hopeful and looking forward to this. this is the same guy that was strugdlie in strugling with the term compromise. i don't think it's only the president at all. all he's doing i
in the conference were initially skeptical about this, but because of some changes, they decided not to change the age at which the medicare changes would begin hitting. republicans have been promising for years that if you are 55 or older, you will not have to worry about any of these medicare changes. they were thinking of changing that at 56. there was an outcry and they abandoned that plan. now the moderates do seem to be on board. host: the washington times reporting this morning when it comes to the affordable care act, senator ted cruz, texas republican, said he will offer an amendment to delay funding for the affordable care act until the economy improves. this is an amendment to a continuing resolution to keep the government funding that the senate will work on this week. it is winning support from other republicans like senator marco rubio of florida. jonathan strong, senate democrats will also unveil a budget tomorrow. guest: the senate budget is more notable in the sense that it has been since 2009 that senate democrats passed a budget. so this is going to be a more significant pol
become a movement, you can try to change with the government or negotiate with the government. deps on your strategy. start small, focus, build around local nonpolitical issues, which is where you learn the technology of nonviolent struggle. then you achieve a little victory. then the people start joining because the people who join the things which are successful. and if you are branded well and know how to communicate, you have a movement, and then see how the government will deal with it, because the more oppressive government is, the less space for use of the suppression. because they already are using every single way of censorship, and they're, after 30 years, i don't find them very flexible in dealing with the new ways of protesting. the more closed the system, the more oppressive regime, the less flexible. really flexible regimes are not the most -- when you look at the really flexible regimes who learned fast, like the one in venezuela or russia, they're not north koreas them real problem with north korea, once they're there, they're cemented in their own little thing. so w
of spending an hour in conversation with in buenos aires last may. nothing has changed, except the color of his cassock. he's remaining himself. and that's a very good sign. because he was a reformer in argentina. he will be a reformer here in rome. but it's going to be a gentle hand on the tiller. gentle but firm. and a bit of humor here, too. he took a nice little bit of catholic inside baseball with that reference to clement xiv, the pope who suppressed the jesuits in the 18th century. that was -- that was fun. we're not used to a lot of fun at papal press conferences. but i think that may be changing, too. >> you know what also seems to have changed, is the language that he used. the direct way with which he communicates, which personally, i find so refreshing. he speaks as a common man, george. am i wrong in that difference between he and his predecessor, who had certainly an air, an intellectual air about him at all times. i mean, and not to be faulted for that, it's just a different tone. >> it is a different tone. i mean, this is a man of keen intelligence, jorge mario bergoglio
things have changed since president reagan was in office, some important fundamentals, those who speak to who we are as americans, have not. i believe that our guest today governor jeb bush understands this. and it's one of the reasons that after having left office just about six years ago he remained an extremely important national voice in the republican party. as we prepare to welcome the governor to the stage, let's first take stock and a handful of issues that we know where of vital importance to ronald reagan and square them up against the words and deeds of jeb bush on the same critical topics today. what are the fundamental issues? we know ronald reagan spent much of his life trying to cut taxes for the average american. he was convinced that it was the man or woman on the street who knew how to spend their dollar more wisely than the federal government and he did all in his power to prove it by cutting taxes. governor jeb bush was in office he cut taxes on floridians by $20 billion. let's talk abut the size of government. ronald reagan was in the white house he dramatically re
's relationship with her changes, changes from uncle cleve, the godfather, to a romantic interest. cleveland starts sending her letters with poems and sends her roses, and it's the full court press on courting her. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> you're watching booktv. and now former florida governor jeb bush argues that the nation's immigration policy should be overhauled to reflect our current economic needs, but also should be b clear enough to enforce properly. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> now, our love whered president finish beloved president ronald reagan passed away almost ten years ago. but as many in this audience know, it seems nearly impossible to follow political news without hearing some reference to our 40th president. his memory, his name and, fortunately, his legacy seem to be ubiquitous as our country grapples with the challenges of our time. for many years, probably starting with the day after president reagan left office in 1989, there's been a famous question often asked when this is a particularly vexing problem facing
wire you writing a book called creating just as? >> guest: i strongly believe in social change. my background is as a public defender. this seems to me that communication is the vehicle to awareness, education, and to move public opinion to the opinion in the direction of what i am considering a more enlightened point of view. >> guest: in your book to use any of your cases, public defender cases as examples? >> none of the cases i've worked on while i was in the public defender's office made it this far. but i do write about cases that i think have a chance to study, had a chance to talk to the lawyers and had a chance to talk to some individuals involved, a family member to family members of the journalists, so they don't come from my personal experience, but a lot of in-depth study. >> host: that change in dna technology, is that beneficial to defendants? >> guest: yes, it can be. a fellow who is on the jacket of my book, it very aptly named individual. the first person exonerated from death row across the country. 1993. first-person exonerating based on dna. and it came to him
. people do not change what they do based on what they know. the change what they do, based on how they feel. when we appreciate that insight we think of the effort -- within differently about delivering certain messages. the message has to be delivered with carey energy, it does not matter how people hear the at -- with care and energy, it does not matter how people hear the message. we have to make it easy for people to do the right thing. we have to grease the road to success. about 20% extra brani energy is required to think to come up with a new idea. we do not want to spend that energy wistfully. it is not because people are dumb or foolish, it is our natural human desire not to have to reinvent the wheel every day. that is why i think we can make things easier. let me show you a slide on numbers of mortality. this is a pretty good estimate of premature mortality causes. some of them are genetic, some environmental. look at the purple part of this graph, bad as medical access. that is the reality that not having access to health care is like having a ship coal and oil into do
in the caucus in the senate says he is certainly not happy and he thinks this change is dangerous and he spoke to reporters on sunday, which is rare. here is what he had to say. >> the tsa ought to smell the coffee. >> reporter: you might call them pocket knives or swiss army knives, have blades smaller than 2.6 inches, a little bit longer than, say, your house key. lonts list of newly allowed things to carry on are ski poles, lacrosse stick and bill yard cues. of course, frederica, not hearing many arguments about those things, clearly unwieldy, it is the knifes that are the main issue here. as senator schumer saying, he thinks because they can folksily hurt an individual, that's one reason that flight attendants are very concerned about this as well. tsa you however, sees things very differently. from tsa's perspective this is about their job being a priority on trying to prevent terrorists from taking over an entire plane. the tsa says that cockpits are protected now, small knifes can no longer get a terrorist to the plane's controls but the tsa says hunting for those knives can distract th
to bring you the forecast for your st. patrick's weekend. >>> it's a big change for the city of hayward, a new major project that changed two lanes of traffic into a loop through downtown. noelle walker reports about what the project is all about and why some business owners are worried. >> reporter: the preparations have been under way for weeks in downtown hayward. through new lights, new cameras and now action. >> change is good. most change is for the better. >> reporter: traffic signs have been warning drivers of tonight's big change. turning left is not right. >> we expect a little bit of confusion. >> we're doing this because it's eight clock. >> so you knew it was coming? >> yeah. >> reporter: at 8:00 the city flipped a new light on a new downtown hayward loop. it turns three main arteries into one way streets it's also turning some seasoned drivers into novice navigators. >> do you know what's happening? >> no. >> do you know where you're going? >> sushi. >> this animation shows the downtown loop around mission, foothill and eighth street. the goal of the $80 million project is
at wgbh access.wgbh.org [eagle caw] >> stephen: tonight, big changes for texas. their 10-gallon hats are now 38-liters. [laughter] then, can our drone program win the war on terror? yes, if you go up, up, down down, b, a, b, a, select. [laughter] and my guest, physicist michio kaku believes an asteroid could destroy the earth. global warming, solved. [laughter] ice land is considering a ban on internet porn. now there's nothing to do in iceland. [ laughter ] this is the colbert report." captioning sponsored by comedy central ( theme song playing ) ( cheers and applause ) [cheers and applause] welcome to the report, everybody. thank you so much for joining us. [cheers and applause] [crowd chanting "stephen!"] thank you, ladies and gentlemen, please sit down. [cheers and applause] welcome to the show, everybody. thank you for joining us. [cheers and applause] thank you, everyone in here welcome to the program. dominus vobiscum. folks, as the cardinal of cable, i'm giving you nave to narthex coverage of pope benedict's resignation in my new series "popewatch: inde-schism 2013." [cheers
, and this is our opportunity to do it. mr. chairman, you have worked with me on your bill making many changes at my request. they have made the bill better and reduced the negative side effects of previous versions. i trust you think so as well because you have included the changes in the new bill. the new bill in your substitute amendment also included a revised bill by senators gillibrand and kirk on the subject of gun trafficking. those revisions also reflect changes that i asked senator gillibrand to make, and i think it would be worthwhile to outline all the changes that have been made to the bill since they were first introduced. i think they demonstrate good faith of the chairman and senator gillibrand. for instance, senator gillibrand's bill originally would have made it a federal crime to transfer two or more guns if that person knew that the result would be a violation of state or local law. that would have given states and localities a one-way incentive to address new gun control measures and force the cost of prosecution and incarceration on the federal government. it also would have cr
of a new pope present a chance for institutional change? plus, another installment of this week in voter suppression. >>> how to walk the fine line when protecting our streets. but first, the rape case igniting a national conversation and turning one small town upside down. good morning. i'm joy reid filling in for melissa harris-perry. a note of caution for parents watching this morning. we're getting started with a very sensitive story, so you may want to send children out of the room. this week two high school football stars from steubenville, ohio, went on trial after being accused of raping a 16-year-old girl from just across the ohio river, in nearby west virginia. now a crime and justice story in a small town like steubenville isn't usually the makings of national news and the alleged events on the night in question are sadly not remarkable for their rarity. we know that one in six american women is a survivor of an attempted or completed sexual assault. and we know 44% of survivors are under the age of 18. but thanks to an unusual aspect of this case, we all know now in graphic d
is still dead. that has not changed. there is something new and wh wr he will spend the future. that's coming up. wh wr he will spend the future. that's coming up. hwh wr he will spend the future. that's coming up. wherwh wr he w future. that's coming up. ewh wr he will future. that's coming up. where wr he will spend the future. that's coming up. wherewr he wil future. that's coming up. where he will spend the future. that's coming up. wears off. been there. tried that. ladybug body milk? no thanks. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. it's so powerful you can skip a day... but light enough you won't want to. dermatologist recommended eucerin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. with command strips from 3m. designed to stick and eliminate odors anywhere. like this overflowing trashcan. to test it, we brought in the scott family. so what do you smell? beach house and you're looking out over the ocean. some place like, uh, hawaii in like a flower
of which have changed over to republican. so it gives a little evidence foffer that long-term party change as well. here in the republican controlled chambers, you see a stark difference. republicans become more successful. particularly republican men are the most successful about legislating about women's issues. particularly republican men have the least to say about women's issues. they introduce the fewest bills and they pass the fewest bills. the south dakota democratic women did not even introduce anything, so they had nothing to pass. so while this is better, i saw all these partisan differences and they did not really match with a lot of research prior to that. so i am working on now trying to understand both of these party changes at the same time, especially this long-term change in how democratic and republican women see women's issues. but i wanted to point something out. i think i mentioned what has been termed the party gap. i see a big difference between democratic women increasing and increasing their election to office and republican women, as someone put it, flatlining. i
change for the city of hayward, a new major project that changed two lanes of traffic into a loop through downtown. noelle walker reports about what the project is all about and why some business owners are worried. >> reporter: the preparations have been under way for weeks in downtown hayward. through new lights, new cameras and now action. >> change is good. most change is for the better. >> reporter: traffic signs have been warning drivers of tonight's big change. turning left is not right. >> we expect a little bit of confusion. >> we're doing this because it's eight clock. >> so you knew it was coming? >> yeah. >> reporter: at 8:00 the city flipped a new light on a new downtown hayward loop. it turns three main arteries into one way streets it's also turning some seasoned drivers into novice navigators. >> do you know what's happening? >> no. >> do you know where you're going? >> sushi. >> this animation shows the downtown loop around mission, foothill and eighth street. the goal of the $80 million project is faster traffic. congestion is graded from a which is sailing through to f.
, he has not spoken publicly since the health scare erupted. but next month that might change. he is slated to attend a hearing that could result in the removal of his state certification. rick? day david lee miller, thanks. >> there is new information on a massive landslide in washington state. officials urging the public to stay away from the site in this cliff side neighborhood! it is easy to see why. take a look at these pictures, the before and after. the landslide damaging several properties and forcing evacuations for nearly three dozen homes. dominique is live from our los angeles bureau. dominique? >> you know this is an astonishing sight in whidbey island. the authorities even can't get over the scale of how much earth moved. >> this was a surprise of its size. it is huge. it is a tremendously large landslide we were not expecting. nobody expects these types of things. we are constantly watching to make sure the areas that are adjacent to either side or other areas that look like this, that they are not also experiencing issues. >> wisely so they are keeping the public b
change everything? after tiger woods's fall from grace we'll look at both sides of the coin. 20,000 dollars -- for a smartphone? is it that smart? you're in the cnn newsroom. i'm don lemon. we'll start with this. a real life nightmare for patient who is thought their biggest challenge would be recovering from dental surgery. hundreds of people around the tulsa oklahoma area. their cases, about 7,000 in all are linked to tulsa dentist dr. scott harrington. investigators say it was an unsanitary, chaotic and contaminated mess. straight to susan candiotti now live from tulsa. susan, have a lot of people shown up for the test so far? >> reporter: we know of about 200 so far. we'll get final numbers later tonight. the state asking 7,000 patients of dr. harrington's to be tested. that's after state inspectors here in oklahoma found what they call deplorable practices including expired drugs and rusty dental instruments that would have been used during oral surgery. you can imagine what patients are going through. this all started after authorities found a patient diagnosed -- or rathe
in the way of real policy changes of initiatives and he certainly is the hope and change pope but he's the head of a body the vatican that's very resistant to change. i've read, for instance, that observers say you don't change the vatican, the vatican changes you. therefore it's an old bureaucracy that doesn't use modern technology, modern message the way that some of ththe archbishops are used to. he's going to have quite a challenge trying to change the basic nature of the church, of the vatican, of the curia. he has made an announcement that he will not at the moment be making any changes in his staff. that itself is a break from tradition. we'll have to see who he appoints to what position to gauge how far he plans to go in changing this ancient institution. >> in light of that fact, how is he going to deal with serious problems? a report from the vatican scandal, the sexual abuse that has occurred for years, if not decades, and the report that is being left behind by pope benedict emeritus. how is he going to be dealing with those things? >> reporter: that's a report that was p
. the substitute also incorporates a number of changes, the result of suggestions from senator grassley and his staff. we have been working on this since january. tried to be responsive to the ranking member's concerns and suggestions, and have reached across the aisle to other senators. as an a.t.f. whistleblower, senator grassley has been the lead senator in whistleblower legislation, was an a.t.f. whistleblower, who testified last congress that the existing laws are toothless and they can't help law enforcement, and that's why law enforcement consistently has called for firearms trafficking statute that can be effective and go after straw purchasers. we need now is to create better law enforcement tools. and i think this will -- the senators can join together on this will close a very dangerous loophole in the law that mexican drug cartels and gangs and other criminals have exploited for too long. stop illegal trafficking. the firearms act is important. this week the "usa today" ran a front page story about a study that estimates gun violence costs americans $12 billion, $12 billion a year.
cloudy skies, some patchy fog moving around the bay. we'll take a look at the forecast, minor changes as we head into the weekend. >>> parents and students react to a threatening note found in a pleasanton school. >>> an earthquake hit and who felt it. >>> what a local vatican scholar says a new pope might mean in the sex abuse scandal. >>> another carnival cruise ship in trouble, the ktvu morning news continues. >>> good morning. thank you for waking up with us on this thursday morning. march 14. i'm pam cook. >> good morning, i'm dave clark. let's check your weather and traffic. it sounds good. >> another nice forecast. we'll shave off a few degrees. but these are all some tiny changes, patchy fog this morning, a few high clouds into the bay area. temperatures this afternoon range from the low 60s at the coast, warmest locations no more 80s but still some mid to upper 70s for your thursday afternoon. more on the weekend forecast in a few minutes. sal has an update on traffic. >> good morning, mark. 237 looks good. near 680 a crash on the shoulder, you may see mark vehicles. looking
garb, not in papal white but in simple priestley black. he changed later on. but in any case it was another sign of what we've been talking about all along, his humility. i took a closer look at the new pope in a story last night. >> translator: begin this journ journey. >> reporter: his journey began wednesday when cardinal jorge mario bergoglio of argentina was elected to lead the catholic church. he's the first non-european pope since the 8th century and first pope ever from south america. he will called pope francis, in honor of st. francis of assisi. bergoglio was born in 1936 in buenos aires, argentina. the son of an italian i'll grant, a railway worker. he had four brothers and sisters. he studied to brk a chemist before receiving the call to the priesthood. the 76-year-old was ordained a jesuit in december of 1969. and has served as orsh bishop of buenos aires. he was made a cardinal on february 21st, 2001. bergoglio is said to have been the runner-up in a 2005 concl e conclave. and in 2013 he was the oldest of the possible candidate, barely mentioned ad eed as a top
being pulled. making the shooter perhaps change his plan instead of mass murder, he killed himself. shep? >> shepard: phil, any idea from authorities yet on a motive? >> not much here. the university was actually in the process of evicting him because he had yet to pay for this semester. he was a college junior majoring in business. the school has absolutely no record of ever receiving psychological counseling, no record of any student conduct issues. and he was still living in his dorm room with three roommates who, according to ucf, describe him as a loner with few friends. >> actually, the roommate was surprised. the roommate said that he exhibited some antisocial behavior previously, but they had no reason to believe they had never seen him with a weapon. they had never seen him with ammunition. they had no reason to believe that he was going to show any kinds of violence whatsoever. >> all classes at ucf do resume tomorrow and that tower, tower one, the residence hall is now totally back open. so about 500 displaced students all day can finally get back to their rooms, shep. >> shep
of that is going to change when gay couples are allowed to do the same. the fact is that throughout the nation's history, gay couples and gay individuals have been paying their taxes, and by paying our taxes, we help support all the legal benefits and protections of marriage. according to the government accountability office, there are over 01100 legal benefits and protections that are given to married couples. we have been subsidizing those throughout the nation's history. yet we are unable to take advantage of those same incentives to marry. that cannot be constitutional. host: let me ask you this. should the court be jumping in at this point? one of the arguments being made by the lawyers for proposition 8, today's oral argument, is that there is a social movement happening. polls are showing more people in favor. let that take place. let states decide what they want to do. is there a role for the supreme court? caller: of course there is. this cannot be accomplished in a piecemeal, state-by-state basis. most of the legal benefits of marriage come from the federal government. but me give yo
into their 90's and that's a great thing. one thing that hasn't changed -- the official retirement age. the question is how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live from washington, moderator gwen ifill. gwen: good evening. some weeks demand more analysis than others. white house tours were canceled but it wasn't about that. republicans and democrats issued competing budget blueprints but it wasn't about that either. what it seemed to be about as self-definition, a sudden recognition that in the eyes of the american people they've been doing it all wrong, so the president went repeated by to capitol hill. >> over the last several weeks the press here in washington has been reporting about obama's charm offensive. all i've been doing is just calling up folks and trying to see if we can brea
enforcement more effective tools. the substitute also incorporates a number of changes, the result of suggestions from senator grassley and his staff. we have been working on this since january. tried to be responsive to the ranking member's concerns and suggestions, and have reached across the aisle to other senators. as a a.t.f. whistleblower, senator grassley has been the lead senator in whistleblower legislation, was a a.t.f. whistleblower, who testified last congress that the existing laws are toothless and they can help law enforcement -- can't help law enforcement, and that's why law enforcement consistently has called for firearms trafficking statute that can be effective and go after straw purchasers. we need now is to create better law enforcement tools. and i think this will -- the senators can join together on this will close a very dangerous loophole in the law that mexican drug cartels and gangs and other criminals have exploited for too long. stop illegal trafficking the firme arms act is important. this week -- the firearms act is important. this week the "usa today
will harm average americans, drive up unemployment, change america permanently in negative ways and on the other hand will be supported by businessmen who will never vote for a republican anyway? as far as i can tell you that republican talk radio and tv shows will vote for it. there's many consequences to amnesty but if amnesty goes through then america will become california and no republican will ever win another election. [applause] richard nixon and ronald reagan will never elect another republican. want see why democrats amnesty why on earth is marco rubio and these bushes pushing for it. they are panicked and demoralized after the last election. stop panicking republicans. liberal writing the obituary of the republican party right now remind me of new homeowners at the height of the housing bubble. people announce their complete triumph moments before their crushing defeat. our job -- our job is to ensure democrats have that crushing defeat. thank you and ill take some questions. [applause] >> go ahead. >> do you believe that chris christie should have been invited to cpa
will rise. they know that these changes will create more competition because consumers will be able to log onto an easy website, have a lot more choices on who they want to ensure them. dagen: fried, they are not making it up. they face a lot of restrictions. they also have the reduced ability to set rates based on age. that, obviously, you will have higher premiums as a young healthy individual because you have to bear the cost of that. >> that is not the case. dagen: i am asking brad. >> rates have already gone up. they went up even before obamacare had passed. they have to create huge reserves for the new people who are coming on board. my rates have already gone up. they are telling their brokers, look, not only will your business model change, but rates will increase for your customers yet again. the government has created such restriction on the marketplace. it is no longer free market. businesses are finding ways to skirt the laws. they are making full-time employees part-time employees. it does not help the 15 million unemployed. dagen: when president obama said if you like your he
for the bailout, and i'm sure you do as well. have you been able to change anybody's mind who perhaps opposed the bailout and then upon seeing the results felt that in retrospect it was a good idea? >> guest: we became known as government motors to a lot of people. no question that hurt gm and continues to target today. but we did pay back the loan to the government, and we have payback a lot of the equity investment the government made. and yes, i think people want gm to succeed. the government motors label is still there to some extent, still affects some people but i think it is less now. and i think once the indebtedness is totally pay, i think that will go away. >> in the book you talk about what you found when you arrive at general motors. a lot of it was not necessarily apparent to the public. the financial results were, but what you then we started looking underneath the hood so to speak is revealed very much in the first time in the book. chair with a a little bit about some of the surprises for you as a seasoned executive when you arrived in detroit. >> guest: well, i expected certa
everything that we can to combat the threat of climate change, that we're going to be creating jobs and economic opportunity in the first place. they are going to be a great team. these are some of my top priorities going forward. >> ifill: moniz is an m.i.t. physicist who runs an energy initiative on new ways to produce power and curb emissions. he also served as undersecretary of energy during the clinton administration. mccarthy already works in the administration as assistant administrator for the e.p.a.'s office of air and radiation. she has run state environmental agencies in connecticut and massachusetts, working for five governors including mitt romney. moniz and mccarthy would replace outgoing cabinet members steven chu and lisa jackson. early last month the president also tapped business executive sally jewel to replace ken salazar as interior secretary. the nominees face major challenges. one imminent decision involves debate over approval of the keystone ex-seal pipeline that would move crude oil from canada to the gulf. the project has drawn environmental protests but a
. >>> one of the most famous college dropouts plans to change how future generations go to college. an interview with bill gates. >>> and -- ♪ i don't want to be another wave in the ocean ♪ >> bon jovi provided a sound track for a generation. he's talking to us. hello, everyone. i'm don lemon. all that ahead this hour. first, this. defense secretary chuck hagel is getting a firsthand look at how dangerous afghanistan remains 11 years into the war. also a direct message from the taliban. he's making his first visit since being appointed last month. . it began on a deadly note. a suicide bomber detonated a device in kabul. nine people were killed. a half an hour later nine others were killed when another suicide bomber attacked a check point south of kabul. >> we're at war. war didn't stop. and we have a war here. that's just the reality. we're going to continue to work with the afghans and our coalition partners to fight that war and to assure that the afghan people have every ability and right to develop their own country, their own way in a democracy. >> so taliban claims resp
: are there any senators in the chamber wishing to vote or change their vote? the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 45, the nays are 54. under the previous order requiring 60 votes for the adoption of this amendment, the amendment is not agreed to. ms. mikulski: move to reconsider. mr. mccain: move to lay on the table. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. brown: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from ohio. mr. brown: i ask unanimous consent to speak up to two minutes and after my remarks the senior senator from arizona be recognized. the presiding officer: is there objection? is there objection to the modified request? without objection. mr. brown: madam president, thank you. i want to not yet call up, i've been working with chairwoman mikulski on this until they get an agreement but i'll just discuss for a moment amendment 83 i'm cosponsoring with senator isakson of georgia. it really does help us restore as chairmanwoman mikulski has been working towards, regular order in this chamber. this is an amendment having to do with some chang dealing -- language de
a homeless man who found a diamond engagement ring in his change cuff and he returned it to its grateful owner. that one good deed completely changed his life. he will be here to tell us all about it. >> looking forward to that. we begin, though, this morning with that early spring snowstorm rolling across the country. we are keeping you very busy, phyllis. >> this weather is just relentless. good morning, ereka. good morning, everyone. parts of the midwest from wichita, kansas, all the way to indianapolis are seeing more heavy snow this morning as we deal with the winter weather that doesn't want to end. >> on i-25 near johnston, colorado, a fiery collision between a tanker truck and a car. >> looks like the propane was caught on fire with people. you can't even describe what it looked like. you can't even describe it. >> reporter: along with it a massive pile-up. >> four or five semis and, like, 40 cars. truck drivers on the road, it's tough. i never see anything like this. >> reporter: one wrecked vehicle was pulled after another out of the tangled pile of steel. several people were h
of politics. let's talk in a broad sense about the changing country and the changing political parties. >> one of the major things that we forget, because we're so comfortable with the united states being a two-party system and that being what democracy is or at least is here, we forget that during the early republic, there wasn't a two- party system, that the founding fathers hated parties and thought they would be terrible for democracy. there was this generation, particularly martin van buren who said we need to have an ordered, structured system, of making political things happen and that's the parties. we have to have a philosophy. we have to show up together and vote on the same thing and we have to hang together, or these sections of the country or these differences in the democracy will spin out of control, and actually they did. >> how did washington, d.c. change over these 12 years? >> it grew like crazy. at the beginning, of course, it was basically just kind of a big -- with trees and dirt and then there would be a house and a building there. then it became actually a city and it b
. then he changed it to paths of prosperity. that's the one he stuck with today. well to paraphrase shakespeare a ryan budget by any other name would still smell unsweet. it would eliminate most of obama-care, it would repeal financial regulation, and it would make major cuts to medicare. sounds great. here he is trying to convince americans that they want this tired 'ol lemon of a plan. >> it's a path to prosperity, a responsible balanced budget. we believe we owe the american people a balanced budget. for the third straight year we've delivered. >> michael: congressman, what you owe the american people is respect. they're smart enough to understand that you introduced the exact same budget during the election and you lost. jay carney today said that the president wants to trim medicare but with a scalpel not an axe. and ryan let slip his real plan for medicare system. >> this to us is something that we're not going to give up on because we're not going to give up on destroying the healthcare system for the american people. >> michael: that was bushan it was so man. was it a freudi
off the case, change the subject and not answer the question asked. no criticism, he's a good friend, but he should have probably stuck to one question each. and let me just say that that setup where they have the president and a foreign leader, in this case our president was the guest, but those kinds of news conferences don't produce very much because they're usual -- there are usually only two questions per side, so you don't get a wide-ranging exchange when that happens. >> and you often have translations. > which slows things down. >> and a frequent person inside the white house believe -- briefing room, martha has written a book, "the messaging the president, inside the hite house briefing room," glad to have you with us. >> thank you. >> let's talk about how all this evolved. the first conference was a certainly inauspicious occasion but it's certainly evolved over the last 100 years. >> it did. and the following week woodrow wilson had reporters then come into the east room where he talked to them about what his relationship was going to be with reporters, how he needed them.
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